Enforcing Child Support Payments in New Hampshire

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Enforcing Child Support Payments in New Hampshire

Enforcing Child Support Payments in New Hampshire

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire includes the possibility of modifying support orders. If there is a significant change in circumstances, either parent can request a modification through the court, with assistance from DCSS. The welfare of children and custodial parents depends on making sure child support payments are made on schedule and in full. There are various systems in place in New Hampshire to make sure child support orders are followed. A thorough examination of the procedure and the instrument for enforcement is provided here.

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The Role of the Division of Child Support Services (DCSS)

The New Hampshire Division of Child Support Services (DCSS) is the primary agency responsible for enforcing child support orders. DCSS offers various services, including locating non-custodial parents, establishing paternity, and enforcing child support and medical support orders.

See also  Wisconsin Child Support

Methods of Enforcement

1. Income Withholding

Automatic Deduction: Income withholding is the most common method for enforcing child support. Employers are required to deduct child support payments directly from the non-custodial parent’s wages.

Unemployment Benefits: If the non-custodial parent is receiving unemployment benefits, child support can be deducted from these payments.

2. Tax Refund Interception

The DCSS can intercept federal and state tax refunds to cover unpaid child support.

3. License Suspension

Driver’s License: The state can suspend or revoke the non-custodial parent’s driver’s license if they fall behind on payments.

Professional Licenses: Professional and occupational licenses can also be suspended, impacting the non-custodial parent’s ability to work.

4. Contempt of Court

If the non-custodial parent willfully fails to pay child support, the custodial parent can file a motion for contempt. If found in contempt, the non-custodial parent may face fines or jail time.

5. Liens and Property Seizure

DCSS can place liens on the non-custodial parent’s property, such as real estate, cars, or bank accounts, to collect overdue child support.

6. Credit Bureau Reporting

Unpaid child support can be reported to credit bureaus, which can affect the non-custodial parent’s credit score.

Steps for Custodial Parents

1. Contact DCSS

If you’re having trouble receiving child support payments, your first step should be to contact DCSS. They can guide you through the enforcement process and take necessary actions.

2. Keep Records

Maintain detailed records of all child support payments received and any communication with the non-custodial parent regarding support. This documentation can be crucial if you need to go to court.

See also  Understanding Child Support Calculation in Oregon

3. File a Motion for Contempt

If DCSS enforcement methods are not effective, you may need to file a motion for contempt in family court. An attorney can assist with this process, ensuring your case is presented effectively.

Legal Assistance

While DCSS provides valuable services, there may be times when legal assistance is necessary. Family law attorneys specializing in child support can offer personalized advice and representation, helping ensure that your child’s financial needs are met.

In order to guarantee that support orders are followed, a range of techniques are used in New Hampshire to enforce child support payments. The state has strong systems in place to assist custodial parents and their kids, whether it is through income withholding, tax refund interception, or litigation. In order to get the support your child needs, don’t be afraid to contact DCSS or seek legal counsel if you run into problems.

Custodial parents can ensure their children receive the necessary financial assistance by navigating the intricacies of child support enforcement in New Hampshire and making use of the options available to them.

Frequently Asked Questions About Enforcing Child Support Payments in New Hampshire

1. How do I apply for child support enforcement services?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire starts with applying for child support enforcement services through the Division of Child Support Services (DCSS). You can complete an application online, by mail, or in person at a DCSS office.

2. What happens if the non-custodial parent changes jobs?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire requires immediate notification to DCSS if the non-custodial parent changes jobs. The new employer will be contacted, and income withholding orders will be updated to ensure continued child support payments.

See also  Child Custody Relocation Rules And Regulations

3. Can child support payments be modified?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire includes provisions for modification if there is a significant change in circumstances, such as income changes, job loss, or changes in custody arrangements. Either parent can request a modification through the court, and DCSS can assist with this process.

4. What if the non-custodial parent moves out of state?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire when the non-custodial parent moves out of state is managed through the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA). DCSS can work with child support agencies in other states to enforce the support order.

5. Can I collect child support if the non-custodial parent is self-employed?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire from a self-employed non-custodial parent can be more challenging but remains enforceable. DCSS may take actions such as intercepting tax refunds, placing liens on property, or seizing bank accounts to collect overdue payments.

6. What should I do if I’m not receiving child support payments?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire requires you to contact DCSS if you are not receiving payments. They can initiate enforcement actions such as income withholding, tax refund interception, or license suspension to ensure compliance.

7. How long does it take to enforce a child support order?

Enforcing child support payments in New Hampshire can vary in duration based on the specific circumstances of the case and the enforcement methods used. Some actions, like income withholding, can be implemented relatively quickly, while others, like court proceedings, may take longer.

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